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USA - The Guantanamo Docket
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USA - Guantanamo. Judge Acosta Throws Out Confession of Suspect as Derived From Torture

August 18, 2023:

(August 18, 2023) - Judge Throws Out Confession of Bombing Suspect as Derived From Torture----The Saudi defendant, accused of orchestrating the attack on the U.S.S. Cole in 2000, was waterboarded and subjected to other forms of torture by the C.I.A. in 2002 in a secret prison network.
The military judge in the U.S.S. Cole bombing case on Friday threw out confessions the Saudi defendant had made to federal agents at Guantánamo Bay after years of secret imprisonment by the C.I.A., declaring the statements the product of torture.
The decision deprives prosecutors of a key piece of evidence against Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, 58, in the longest-running death-penalty case at Guantánamo Bay. He is accused of orchestrating Al Qaeda’s suicide bombing of the warship on Oct. 12, 2000, in Yemen’s Aden Harbor that killed 17 U.S. sailors.
“Exclusion of such evidence is not without societal costs,” the judge, Col. Lanny J. Acosta Jr., wrote in a 50-page decision. “However, permitting the admission of evidence obtained by or derived from torture by the same government that seeks to prosecute and execute the accused may have even greater societal costs.”
The question of whether the confessions were admissible had been seen as a crucial test of a more than decade-long joint effort by the Justice and Defense Departments to prosecute accused architects of Qaeda attacks at the special Guantánamo court, which was designed to grapple with the impact of earlier, violent C.I.A. interrogations while pursuing justice through death-penalty trials.
Similar efforts to suppress confessions as tainted by torture are being made in the case against Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and four other prisoners who are accused of conspiring in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Mr. Nashiri, like Mr. Mohammed, was waterboarded and subjected to other forms of torture in 2002 by C.I.A. interrogators, including contract psychologists, through a program of “enhanced interrogation.”
Saudi national Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri is accused of organizing the bombing of the U.S. Navy destroyer Cole by Al Qaeda on Oct. 12, 2000, in the port of Aden, Yemen, during a routine refueling stop. Seventeen American sailors were killed in the attack.
Nashiri was captured in October 2002 and spent four years in the custody of the C.I.A., including in black site prisons, where he was subjected to waterboarding, forced nudity, extreme isolation, sleep deprivation and other forms of abuse.
This death-penalty case at Guantánamo Bay, which has been in pretrial proceedings since Nashiri’s arraignment in November 2011, has been bogged down by long delays as the court tries to deal with the legacy of Nashiri’s torture.
Lanny Acosta is currently serving as the pretrial judge. In May 2021, he agreed to consider information obtained during Nashiri’s torture by C.I.A. interrogators to support an argument in pretrial proceedings. Acosta is expected to decide some key pretrial issues in the case before stepping down to retire.
In January 2022, the Biden administration pledged to no longer use the statements by Nashiri that were obtained from torture, rejecting an interpretation by prosecutors involved in the case in the case that such evidence could be used in pretrial proceedings.
Testimony showed that the psychologists took part in a yearslong program that, even after the violent interrogation techniques ended, used isolation, sleep deprivation, punishment for defiance and implied threats of more violence to keep the prisoners cooperative and speaking to interrogators.
Prosecutors considered Mr. Nashiri’s confessions to federal and Navy criminal investigative agents at Guantánamo in early 2007, four months after his transfer from a C.I.A. prison, to be among the best evidence against him.
But prosecutors also sought, and received permission from the judge, to use a transcript from other questioning at Mr. Nashiri’s eventual trial.
In March 2007, he went before a military panel examining his status as an enemy combatant and was allowed to address allegations involving his role in Al Qaeda plots. He told military officers that he had confessed after being tortured by the C.I.A., but then recanted.
At the administrative hearing, Mr. Nashiri denied being a member of Al Qaeda or involvement in the plots but admitted to knowing Osama bin Laden and receiving funds from him for an unrealized shipping business project in the Persian Gulf.
Human rights and international law experts had been eagerly awaiting the decision as a test of a U.S. government theory that federal agents could obtain a lawful confession, untainted by previous abuse, if so-called clean teams questioned the defendants without threats or violence and repeatedly told former C.I.A. prisoners that their participation was voluntary.
But testimony in the pretrial hearings showed that after his capture in 2002, Mr. Nashiri was subjected to both authorized and unauthorized physical and emotional torture in an odyssey through the C.I.A. secret prison network — from Thailand to Poland to Afghanistan and then Guantánamo Bay — that included waterboarding, confinement inside a cramped box, rectal abuse and being tormented with a revving drill beside his hooded head to coerce him to answer interrogators’ questions about future and suspected Qaeda plots.
By the time he was questioned by federal agents in January 2007, lawyers and experts argued, the prisoner was trained to respond to his interrogators’ questions.
Judge Acosta, who retires from the Army next month, agreed.
Mr. Nashiri had no reason to believe “that his circumstances had substantially changed when he was marched in to be interviewed by the newest round of U.S. personnel in late January 2007,” Judge Acosta said.
“If there was ever a case where the circumstances of an accused’s prior statements impacted his ability to make a later voluntary statement, this is such a case. Even if the 2007 statements were not obtained by torture or cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment, they were derived from it.”
Rear Adm. Aaron C. Rugh, the chief prosecutor for military commissions, did not respond to a question about whether his team would appeal the ruling. With a new judge expected later this year, prosecutors could seek reconsideration at the Guantánamo court or raise the issue with a Pentagon appeals panel, the Court of Military Commissions Review.
Separately, the panel is considering a challenge to Colonel Acosta’s status as the judge in the U.S.S. Cole case. Defense lawyers had asked him to step down earlier this year when he disclosed that he was applying for a post-retirement, civilian job as clerk of the Air Force Judiciary. Colonel Acosta refused, saying he had disclosed his application the day after he applied for the job, and so there was no hidden bias in favor of the government.
Katie Carmon, one of Mr. Nashiri’s lawyers, said there were no immediate plans to withdraw their challenge and called Colonel Acosta’s decision suppressing the 2007 interrogations both “morally and legally correct.”
“The government that tortured Mr. al-Nashiri has never been held accountable,” she said. “But today’s ruling is a small step forward as the government loses a critical part of its prosecution.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2023/08/18/us/politics/guantanamo-cole-bombing-confession-torture.html

(Source: New York Times, 18/08/2023)

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IRAN - Sobhan Eftekharedin executed in Aligudarz on August 27
IRAN - Wafa Kharamani executed in Saqqez on August 27
IRAN - Milad Yazdanpanah executed in Zarand on August 26
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USA - Mississippi. Howard M. Neal resentenced to life WITH parole
IRAN - Mehdi Karami executed in Karaj on August 23
IRAN - 3 men executed in Qezel Hesar on August 23
IRAN - Unidentied man executed in Mahvelat on August 23
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IRAN - Shouresh Morovati executed in Sanandaj on August 22
IRAN - 3 men executed in Kerman on August 21
IRAN - Jamil Abodllahzadeh and Mehran Amiri executed in Qazvin on August 21
IRAN - 5 men executed in Zahedan on August 21
IRAN - Yazdan Varehzardi executed in Ahvaz on august 21
IRAN - Abdolreza Ghalavand executed in Ahvaz on August 21
IRAN - Rasoul Narouyi executed in Kahnuj on August 21
IRAN - Mousa Afkhami executed in Sari on August 20
USA - New Restorative Justice Webpage
IRAN - Abdul Samad Shahozehi and Mahmoud Rigi executed in Zahedan on August 19
IRAN - Unidentified man executed in Dezful on August 19
TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: FOUR CONVICTED KILLERS REMOVED FROM DEATH ROW
IRAN - Hossein Javadi executed in Maragheh on August 16
IRAN - Ibrahim Moulodpour executed in Dezful on August 16
BANGLADESH: MAN SENTENCED TO DEATH FOR KILLING WIFE IN SYLHET
IRAN - 3 men executed on August 13

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